Five Years After My Cancer Diagnosis

January 2, 2015. That’s five years ago, but I’ll never forget being told I had cancer.

I immediately got light-headed and felt like I was going to pass out. I always thought people fainting from receiving bad news was an exaggeration in movies and TV shows, but there I was, suddenly covered in a cold sweat over every inch of my suddenly cancerous body.

My wife of almost 4 months put her arm around me for support–a posture she would maintain physically, emotionally and psychologically for the next six months, as we celebrated our first married Valentine’s Day in a hospital room and marched together through six long months of chemotherapy.

Hodgkin’s Lymphoma is the good kind of cancer, a fact I am forever grateful for, especially as I look back on the experience now and await the all clear “cured” status of five years’ remission this summer. But cancer is cancer and chemo is chemo. It was devastating and difficult, while simultaneously sanctifying and transformative. I’m a survivor now, and I claim that title with a cocktail of pride and humility at the company it puts me in.

How will I talk about this experience with my kids? How will I explain to them the love that I felt from family, friends and strangers who supported me from near and far, in physical and metaphysical ways? I want them to understand the importance of being there for people when life is unexpectedly turned upside down, even if being there just means sending a text message or a card. I want them to understand the real and awesome power of prayer. I want them to believe that bad things can be used to illuminate the best things, and that God is present in all of it. I want them to understand that I believe I was spared from this disease so that they could be born, and so that I would be prepared to be a better father for them.

I want them to know that I am grateful for this experience in ways that I never would have thought remotely possible as I sat in a sterile examination room and almost hit the deck at the news of my diagnosis.

I’m not who I was before I had cancer, and I never will be again. In most of the ways that matter, I believe that’s a good thing.

Please say a prayer tonight for everyone who is battling cancer, those who have conquered it and those who died bravely in the fight. Say another prayer for all the heroic caretakers of cancer patients. If you know someone currently battling the disease, please send them a message of support right now. You don’t know how much it will mean to them, but I do.

#DownWithLumpy

4 thoughts on “Five Years After My Cancer Diagnosis

  1. maddyk January 3, 2020 / 11:42 am

    You and I share the HL diagnosis anniversary – albeit 3 years apart. Your blog helped me a lot with dealing with the reality of it all. Wishing you all the best things, today and always.

    Liked by 1 person

    • rounding30 January 3, 2020 / 6:22 pm

      Thank you so much for sharing that. It means so much to me that my blog can help people who share my experience. I hope all is well for you, too!

      Like

  2. Paul McFerron January 4, 2020 / 12:54 am

    Pet scan Monday all clear 2.5 years remission Berikitt Lymphoma.Thank you for the blog

    Liked by 1 person

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